From: drodowicz on
Last night, my wife and I went to a presentation by Pulaski tickets and
Tours/Condominium Travel Club. Has anyone ever heard of this
organization?

Their pitch was basically: sign up with us, become an affiliated Travel
Agent and get the benefits of being a travel agent - deep discounted
cruises, airfare, hotel and then access to 6 weeks of Condos anywhere
in the world at a great price (1 bdrm $499, 2 bdrm $599, 3 bdrm $699).
They also have occasional last minute "hot weeks" of condos starting at
$99/week. We would also receive commissions on what we book for
ourselves and for anyone else (from 20-50% of the total commission
received by them). We can use their IATA number and we receive a CLIA
membership.

My wife's mother took our entire family on a cruise last year and they
claimed that if we had booked it as a member of their company, we would
have saved the entire membership fee - which is quite hefty (nearly
$7K). Of course, they presented urgency (we would both become licensed
agents, being able to double our resources and access to discounted
travel and it was lifetime and transferrable) to make the decision last
night. Our annual fee is $149. They claim that they have been in
business since 1989 and have 30,000 members just like us. That is what
gives them the buying power.

Any quick response would be much appreciated. We signed up but have
another 2 business days to cancel.

Thanks.

From: Ray Goldenberg on
On 24 Aug 2006 12:29:44 -0700, drodowicz(a)comcast.net wrote:

> Has anyone ever heard of this
>organization?
>
>Their pitch was basically: sign up with us, become an affiliated Travel
>Agent and get the benefits of being a travel agent

Hi,

Yes these scams have been around for years and I usually here from
folks who have seen my posts after it was too late. Run, don't walk
to rescind your contract. Read the 2 articles following my signature.

Best regards,
Ray
LIGHTHOUSE TRAVEL
800-719-9917 or 805-566-3905
http://www.lighthousetravel.com


Vacation Scams Uncovered

A South Carolina man got an unsolicited fax at his office offering a
vacation deal he couldn't refuse.
He quickly called to book the trip, looking forward to the comfortable
resort accommodations, free breakfasts and special cruise outing
promised in the fax.

But when he arrived at the resort, he learned that the ``free'' cruise
would cost him $200, and that to get his room upgraded to the level
promised and receive his ``complimentary'' breakfasts, he'd have to
attend a sales seminar on timeshares.

When a Florida woman got a call offering a vacation deal, she said she
wasn't quite ready to commit. But the telemarketer convinced her to
send a deposit for the trip, promising a full refund if she changed
her mind. When she later tried to cancel the order and get back her
deposit, she was told that it was non-refundable.

A Missouri couple who bought a trip to the Bahamas pitched on the
phone expected to stay in a five-star resort as promised. But what
they got was a dilapidated room with no air conditioning, carpeting,
transportation or easy access to the beach. ``This whole vacation
experience was a nightmare, and absolutely nothing like what was
represented by the company,'' the woman told the Federal Trade
Commission.

Vacations are supposed to be carefree times to unwind and reconnect
with friends and loved ones. But for consumers who unknowingly book
their trips through unscrupulous travel marketers, vacations can be
expensive disappointments.

Travel scams consistently rank near the top of the list of complaints
received by the FTC. In a recent action dubbed ``Operation Travel
Unravel,'' the FTC sued three travel companies for bilking consumers
out of hundreds of thousands of dollars, and Attorneys General in some
40 states announced cases and settlements involving fraudulent travel
operators.

Fraudulent companies promote their travel packages through the mail,
by phone and by unsolicited emails, or ``spam.'' Recently, the FTC has
noted an increase in fraudulent travel promotions advertised through
unsolicited faxes - sometimes disguised to look like they're from a
travel company the consumer may recognize.

A Tennessee woman, for example, received an unsolicited fax at her
office advertising a vacation trip to Orlando, Cocoa Beach and the
Bahamas. The letterhead on the fax looked exactly like the one used by
her employer's travel group, and she thought the unbelievably low
price was a special employee benefit.

Anxious to take advantage of the offer, she quickly booked her trip.

As it turned out, the company had no affiliation with the woman's
employer, and she never received the tickets she paid for.

Some bogus promoters take consumers' money and don't provide a trip.
Other promoters advertise rock-bottom prices, but hide certain fees
until the deal is sealed. Some promise luxurious accommodations and
services, but deliver far less. Still others don't reveal that the
deal includes an obligation to sit through a timeshare pitch at the
destination.

And some promoters guarantee consumers that they can get a full refund
if they decide to cancel the trip, but don't make good on their
promise.

For example, when a Florida woman responded to a fax she received at
work, she found herself getting talked into paying $1,000 for what was
advertised as a $200 vacation. She soon regretted her decision and
called to cancel. She got the runaround and, eight months later, has
yet to see her refund.

Fraudulent travel offers can be hard to distinguish from legitimate
ones. But according to FTC attorney Cindy Liebes, there are some tips
to keep your trip from unraveling.

She recommends that consumers avoid doing business with companies that
use high-pressure sales techniques, promote elaborate trips at
below-market prices, urge you to use a courier service or overnight
mail to send your payment, or tell you they need your credit card
number for identification or verification.

Before buying a vacation package - particularly one advertised at an
unrealistically low price - the FTC encourages you to:

Know who you're dealing with. If you're not familiar with a company,
get its complete name, address and local telephone number. Be wary if
the names of the seller and travel provider differ. You may be dealing
with a telemarketer who has no further responsibility to you after the
sale. As for a company that wants to send a courier for your payment
or asks you to send your payment by overnight delivery, it may be
trying to avoid detection and charges of mail or wire fraud.
Check out the company's track record. Contact the Attorney General,
consumer protection agency and Better Business Bureau where you live
and where the company is based to see if there is a history of
complaints on file. Keep in mind that while a complaint record may
indicate questionable business practices, a lack of complaints doesn't
necessarily mean the company is legitimate. Unscrupulous dealers often
change names and locations to hide a history of complaints.
Verify arrangements before you pay. Get the details of your vacation
in writing, and a copy of the cancellation and refund policies. Ask
the business if it has insurance and whether you should buy
cancellation insurance. Don't accept vague terms such as ``major
hotels'' or ``luxury cruise ships.'' Get the names, addresses and
telephone numbers for the lodgings, airlines and cruise ships you'll
be using. Call to verify your reservations and arrangements.
Use a credit card to make your purchase. If you don't get what you
paid for, you may be able to dispute the charges with your credit card
company. However, don't give your account number over the phone unless
you know the company is reputable. Some telemarketers may claim they
need your account for
From: Dorothy on
Please furnish the address and phone of Pulaski so that I can sign up.
Sounds like a wonderful deal.


<drodowicz(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
news:1156447784.455305.321620(a)m79g2000cwm.googlegroups.com...
> Last night, my wife and I went to a presentation by Pulaski tickets and
> Tours/Condominium Travel Club. Has anyone ever heard of this
> organization?
>
> Their pitch was basically: sign up with us, become an affiliated Travel
> Agent and get the benefits of being a travel agent - deep discounted
> cruises, airfare, hotel and then access to 6 weeks of Condos anywhere
> in the world at a great price (1 bdrm $499, 2 bdrm $599, 3 bdrm $699).
> They also have occasional last minute "hot weeks" of condos starting at
> $99/week. We would also receive commissions on what we book for
> ourselves and for anyone else (from 20-50% of the total commission
> received by them). We can use their IATA number and we receive a CLIA
> membership.
>
> My wife's mother took our entire family on a cruise last year and they
> claimed that if we had booked it as a member of their company, we would
> have saved the entire membership fee - which is quite hefty (nearly
> $7K). Of course, they presented urgency (we would both become licensed
> agents, being able to double our resources and access to discounted
> travel and it was lifetime and transferrable) to make the decision last
> night. Our annual fee is $149. They claim that they have been in
> business since 1989 and have 30,000 members just like us. That is what
> gives them the buying power.
>
> Any quick response would be much appreciated. We signed up but have
> another 2 business days to cancel.
>
> Thanks.
>


From: Ken Conner on
"Dorothy" <dvclarks(a)knology.net> wrote in message
news:c6f9d$44eeea58$186074e6$2744(a)KNOLOGY.NET...
> Please furnish the address and phone of Pulaski so that I can sign up.
> Sounds like a wonderful deal.
>
>
> <drodowicz(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:1156447784.455305.321620(a)m79g2000cwm.googlegroups.com...
>> Last night, my wife and I went to a presentation by Pulaski tickets and
>> Tours/Condominium Travel Club. Has anyone ever heard of this
>> organization?
>>
>> Their pitch was basically: sign up with us, become an affiliated Travel
>> Agent and get the benefits of being a travel agent - deep discounted
>> cruises, airfare, hotel and then access to 6 weeks of Condos anywhere
>> in the world at a great price (1 bdrm $499, 2 bdrm $599, 3 bdrm $699).
>> They also have occasional last minute "hot weeks" of condos starting at
>> $99/week. We would also receive commissions on what we book for
>> ourselves and for anyone else (from 20-50% of the total commission
>> received by them). We can use their IATA number and we receive a CLIA
>> membership.
>>
>> My wife's mother took our entire family on a cruise last year and they
>> claimed that if we had booked it as a member of their company, we would
>> have saved the entire membership fee - which is quite hefty (nearly
>> $7K). Of course, they presented urgency (we would both become licensed
>> agents, being able to double our resources and access to discounted
>> travel and it was lifetime and transferrable) to make the decision last
>> night. Our annual fee is $149. They claim that they have been in
>> business since 1989 and have 30,000 members just like us. That is what
>> gives them the buying power.
>>
>> Any quick response would be much appreciated. We signed up but have
>> another 2 business days to cancel.
>>
>> Thanks.

According to their web site they are registered in three states. I would
start with the BBB in those states.


From: Ray Goldenberg on
On Fri, 25 Aug 2006 13:10:03 GMT, "Ken Conner" <en.conner(a)verizon.net>
wrote:

>According to their web site they are registered in three states. I would
>start with the BBB in those states.

Hi Ken,

Instant Travel Agent Card scams have been around for years. I suggest
checking out articles from the Federal Trade Commission and state
Attorney General's rather than the BBB. Of course the gullible and
greedy will still get taken by these offers.

Best regards,
Ray
LIGHTHOUSE TRAVEL
800-719-9917 or 805-566-3905
http://www.lighthousetravel.com
--
 |  Next  |  Last
Pages: 1 2
Next: Family Sues Overdose Drug Death!