From: Bill Bonde {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously) on


Earl Evleth wrote:
>
> On 30/01/10 15:47, in article 4B644688.9AD9CA9C(a)yahoo.co.uk, "Bill Bonde
> {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously)"
> <tribuyltinafpant(a)yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
>
> >> Cycling, swimming, or simply walking are all superior.
> >>
> > Actually, wrong.
>
> Any citation on that?
>
"Born to Run", http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_McDougall ,
is about the topic. Here's something from BBC:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/7554293.stm
#begin quote
The work tracked 500 older runners for more than 20 years,
comparing them to a similar group of non-runners. All were in their
50s at the start of the study.

Nineteen years into the study, 34% of the non-runners had died
compared to only 15% of the runners.

Both groups became more disabled with age, but for the runners the
onset of disability started later - an average of 16 years later.

The health gap between the runners and non-runners continued to
widen even as the subjects entered their ninth decade of life.

If you had to pick one thing to make people healthier as they age,
it would be aerobic exercise
Lead author Professor James Fries

Running not only appeared to slow the rate of heart and artery
related deaths, but was also associated with fewer early deaths
from cancer, neurological disease, infections and other causes.

And there was no evidence that runners were more likely to suffer
osteoarthritis or need total knee replacements than non-runners -
something scientists have feared.
#end quote

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/6950856.stm
#begin quote
To be healthy, you really do need to break into a sweat when you
exercise, say experts.

American College of Sports Medicine members are concerned official
advice to do 30 minutes of gentle exercise each day is being
misconstrued.

Some may take this to include a mere stroll to the car, Circulation
reports.

People should do at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise five days
a week, or 20 minutes of vigorous exercise, like jogging, three
days a week, they say.
#end quote

But:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8483456.stm
#begin quote
Moderately overweight elderly people may live longer than those of
normal weight, an Australian study suggests.

But being very overweight or being underweight shortened lives.
....
The team tracked the number of deaths over 10 years among
volunteers who were aged 70 - 75 at the start of the study.

It found that those with a BMI which classed them as overweight not
only had the lowest overall risk of dying, they also had the lowest
risk of dying from specific diseases: cardiovascular disease,
cancer and chronic respiratory disease.
#end quote






--
"Gonna take a sedimental journey", what Old Man River actually
said.
From: Bill Bonde {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously) on


Mxsmanic wrote:
>
> Bill Bonde {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously) writes:
>
> > Humans can run down any other animal in existence. What other
> > animal can run 100 miles in a day?
>
> That doesn't mean that running 100 miles a day is a good idea.
>
It is possible damage muscle to the point of killing it by overuse.
That's important to avoid.



> > I'm not sure I prefer "things", but I do tend to prefer nature and
> > I see more of that in more rural settings.
>
> Nature is things.
>
So is a building. I can see the value in looking out over Walden
Pond.



--
"Gonna take a sedimental journey", what Old Man River actually
said.
From: Bill Bonde {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously) on


Mxsmanic wrote:
>
> Bill Bonde {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously) writes:
>
> > Even the "poor" in first world countries have generally enough
> > money to buy staple foods.
>
> Yes, but the cheapest staple foods are calorie-dense carbohydrates. A loaf of
> bread is cheaper than a steak.
>
But you don't need to eat a lot of steak. Most Americans are not
getting too little protein. A legume and a grain together make a
complete protein package. It's hard to claim that beans and corn
are expensive compared to steak.


> Additionally, poor people work longer for less
> money, and have less free time to prepare foods, so they are more inclined to
> buy prepared foods in order to save time. Prepared foods also tend to be very
> high in carbohydrates (crackers, cookies, chips, etc.).
>
No one is forcing them to eat a lot of that. Cooking a balanced
meal is probably going to take twenty minutes out of your TV time.
Maybe put a TV in the kitchen.


> Eating well costs money and requires time, neither of which is in plentiful
> supply among the poor.
>
I would dispute that it takes that much time, and I would dispute
that it costs more than buying pre-packaged foods. It *is* cheaper
to make your own foods that are the cheapest possible, discounting
the nutrition. This is mostly due to the higher costs of getting
your vegetables. I suggest kale, Brussels sprouts, broccoli,
cabbage and others.


--
"Gonna take a sedimental journey", what Old Man River actually
said.
From: EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque) on


Bill Bonde {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously) wrote:
>
> Mxsmanic wrote:
>> Gregory Morrow writes:
>>
>>> Now the capitalist fat cats are skinny, you don't see many wealthy people
>>> who are fat, and obesity is endemic in the poorer classes, primarily a
>>> result of poor but starchy diets.
>> In the poorest countries, the poorest people die of starvation, because there
>> no food. In weatlhy countries, the poorest people die of complications of
>> obesity, because the cheapest food is very calorie-dense.
>>
> Food tends to be the cheapest thing going.

Depends upon your choice of food! If you can buy high quality protein
and fresh produce year-round, it is far from "cheap". High carbohydrate
foods, on the other hand..... (But of course, that's the point Mxxi was
making.)

>
>
From: EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque) on


Mxsmanic wrote:
> Bill Bonde {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously) writes:
>
>> Food tends to be the cheapest thing going. Of course if you insist
>> on buying pre-made TV dinners, your costs will skyrocket.
>
> Food costs have skyrocketed in recent years, and balanced foods with good
> general nutritional value and expensive ingredients like protein are always
> more expensive than cheap carbohydrates.

I don't think it does any good to confuse this jerk with facts, Mxxi!