From: Mxsmanic on
John Rennie writes:

> I'm not quite sure you understand me. You use the example of mashed
> potatoes which has a high GI. We are agreed that high GI foods
> are to be avoided are we not?

A person in normal health need not avoid high GI foods. A person who has
problems with glucose metabolism, such as a diabetic, should probably avoid
them in order to make blood glucose management easier.
From: John Rennie on
Mxsmanic wrote:
> John Rennie writes:
>
>> I'm not quite sure you understand me. You use the example of mashed
>> potatoes which has a high GI. We are agreed that high GI foods
>> are to be avoided are we not?
>
> A person in normal health need not avoid high GI foods. A person who has
> problems with glucose metabolism, such as a diabetic, should probably avoid
> them in order to make blood glucose management easier.

Or a person who wants to avoid getting fat - much more common
than being diabetic. I just don't know why you used that
example when I was endeavouring to explain that not all
carbohydrates are rapidly digested. Good old porridge oats
eaten in moderation is an excellent breakfast; a damn
sight cheaper than bacon, eggs and buttered toast and far
less fattening.
From: Donna Evleth on


> From: "Bill Bonde {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously)"
> <tribuyltinafpant(a)yahoo.co.uk>
> Organization: Our legacy is not the lives we lived but the lives we leave to
> those who come after us.
> Newsgroups: rec.travel.europe,alt.activism.death-penalty
> Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2010 12:58:40 +0000
> Subject: Re: Dutch McDo's 'wrong' to fire worker over cheese slice...
>
>
>
> Earl Evleth wrote:
>>
>> On 30/01/10 15:57, in article 4B6448F6.D5E60329(a)yahoo.co.uk, "Bill Bonde
>> {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously)"
>> <tribuyltinafpant(a)yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
>>
>>> Food tends to be the cheapest thing going.
>>
>> In industrial societies. In 3rd world countries in which
>> the per capital income of the lowest elements of the society
>> are less than $2/day, food is the major "budget" item.
>>
> There's no doubt that there are people on this earth who are baring
> making it food wise. Some are starving. But the issue was first
> world "poor" who often have cell phones, high speed internet, seven
> Showtimes, three HBOs and drive cars around rather than walking or
> riding a bike. My assumption is that they would give those things
> up if they were actually starving, and since they are often
> overweight, the argument that they are starving is silly.
>
Kook Alert.

Donna Evleth
>
> --
> "Gonna take a sedimental journey", what Old Man River actually
> said.

From: Donna Evleth on


> From: "Bill Bonde {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously)"
> <tribuyltinafpant(a)yahoo.co.uk>
> Organization: Our legacy is not the lives we lived but the lives we leave to
> those who come after us.
> Newsgroups: rec.travel.europe,alt.activism.death-penalty
> Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2010 13:01:59 +0000
> Subject: Re: Dutch McDo's 'wrong' to fire worker over cheese slice...
>
>
>
> Donna Evleth wrote:
>>
>>> From: "Bill Bonde {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously)"
>>> <tribuyltinafpant(a)yahoo.co.uk>
>>> Organization: Our legacy is not the lives we lived but the lives we leave to
>>> those who come after us.
>>> Newsgroups: rec.travel.europe,alt.activism.death-penalty
>>> Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2010 16:05:27 +0000
>>> Subject: Re: Dutch McDo's 'wrong' to fire worker over cheese slice...
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Mxsmanic wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Bill Bonde {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously) writes:
>>>>
>>>>> Food tends to be the cheapest thing going. Of course if you insist
>>>>> on buying pre-made TV dinners, your costs will skyrocket.
>>>>
>>>> Food costs have skyrocketed in recent years, and balanced foods with good
>>>> general nutritional value and expensive ingredients like protein are always
>>>> more expensive than cheap carbohydrates.
>>>>
>>> Even the "poor" in first world countries have generally enough
>>> money to buy staple foods.
>>
>> They tend to concentrate on buying cheap staples, like flour, beans, rice.
>> Little or no meat, little or no fresh fruits and vegetables. It's the
>> balance in the diet that is lacking. This is the point Mxsmanic was making,
>> which seems to have gone completely over your head.
>>
> This "Mxsmanic" character is a troll and he made no valid point.
> The people who are "poor" in the 1st world often do not concentrate
> on staples, rather they buy expensive pre-made meals, "TV dinners".
> I've explained this several times, claiming absurdly that they are
> not buying vegetables because they don't have the money when they
> clearly are buying Hot Pockets and sodas is ridiculous.

Can you give statistical proof of this? Are there sociological studies on
who buys the most Hot Pockets (whatever they may be) that you can cite? If
you cannot it's just your own personal opinion, or more accurately, personal
prejudice.

Donna Evleth
>
>
>
>
> --
> "Gonna take a sedimental journey", what Old Man River actually
> said.

From: Donna Evleth on


> From: "Bill Bonde {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously)"
> <tribuyltinafpant(a)yahoo.co.uk>
> Organization: Our legacy is not the lives we lived but the lives we leave to
> those who come after us.
> Newsgroups: rec.travel.europe,alt.activism.death-penalty
> Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2010 13:21:53 +0000
> Subject: Re: Dutch McDo's 'wrong' to fire worker over cheese slice...
>
>
>
> Donna Evleth wrote:
>>
>>> From: "Bill Bonde {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously)"
>>> <tribuyltinafpant(a)yahoo.co.uk>
>>> Organization: Our legacy is not the lives we lived but the lives we leave to
>>> those who come after us.
>>> Newsgroups: rec.travel.europe,alt.activism.death-penalty
>>> Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2010 17:58:10 +0000
>>> Subject: Re: Dutch McDo's 'wrong' to fire worker over cheese slice...
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> John Rennie wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Mxsmanic wrote:
>>>>> Bill Bonde {Colourless green ideas don't sleep furiously) writes:
>>>>>
>>>>>> While this is certainly possible, there are new views that this is
>>>>>> in fact indicative of problems that modern man has with running,
>>>>>> not problems with humans running in general.
>>>>>
>>>>> Given the stress that jogging puts on the knees, it is surprising that
>>>>> human
>>>>> beings tolerate it so well.
>>>>>
>>>>>> Filthy buses, smog filled air, few trees, concrete as far as the
>>>>>> eye can see, that's the city. People who live in the suburbs might
>>>>>> have plenty of clean air, birds, trees, grass, wild animals
>>>>>> wandering about, that sort of thing.
>>>>>
>>>>> It depends on whether you prefer people or things.
>>>>
>>>> Bill is definitely a 'thing's man.
>>>>
>>> I'm not sure what that's supposed to mean although I'll assume it's
>>> yet another insult. I'm not materialist in the sense of being
>>> greedy, if that's what you mean by 'things'. And I'm not
>>> uninterested in conversation, although I want the conversation to
>>> be about issues and not gossip. I know people who are worried
>>> endlessly about who is dating who and that sort of thing. It seems
>>> juvenile out of a 16 year old much less an adult.
>>>
>>> Regarding the city being where the people are, I've noticed that
>>> people give progressively less attention to each other as they get
>>> closer to the big city. Acknowledging everyone who comes by may be
>>> the norm in a rural setting. Water, water, everywhere, no one
>>> really talks to anyone.
>>
>> This is what you've noticed? I live in the big city, and I see people
>> talking to each other all the time.
>>
> You can't be serious. They are on their phones talking to someone.
> They aren't saying high to passers-by. That's what happens in the
> rural setting.
>
>
>
>> Mothers stand in front of the schools
>> chatting with one another while waiting to pick up their children.
>>
> They know each other!

People in rural settings (to coin a word) don't know each other?
>
>
>> Neighbors stop and chat on the street. Dog owners always talk to each other
>> as they walk their dogs. And those are just the ones I can think of off the
>> top of my head.
>>>
>>> I've noticed that cyclists or joggers tend to acknowledge someone
>>> passing them almost universally, when they are also biking or
>>> running. People out for a walk often ignore others. When
>>> backpacking, I've noticed that the rules change, day hikers tend to
>>> have the big city ways and just go on by without saying anything.
>>> I've commented on returning to civilization that we're now within
>>> the range of day hikers because the people are behaving
>>> differently.
>>
>> Cyclists do not acknowledge others here in my city. They are a bunch of
>> scofflaws. They habitually ride on the sidewalk,
>>
> They just want to stay alive. It's also legal, depending on where
> you are, to ride on the "sidewalk".

We've had this argument before. I will simply remind you that here in Paris
it is not legal.
>
>
>
>> come up behind the
>> pedestrians without warning.
>>
> I've noticed that it's difficult to provide a warning when they are
> looking the other way, taking up the entire path.

Bicycles used to have bells, which served to warn the pedestrians. Have all
those bells disappeared?
>
>
>
>> Often they are also riding on the wrong side
>> of the street.
>>
> They may wish to see the cars that are perhaps going to suddenly
> veer their way. I ride on the side that I conclude makes the most
> sense in the context.

This system fails at blind corners. I know from personal experience, having
almost hit a kid who was riding on the wrong side of the street and coming
around the blind corner (there was a large hedge blocking the view) against
the traffic light as well. Bicyclists run red lights a lot.

In fact, a lot of the bicycle riders ride the wrong way on one-way streets.
They are too lazy to go around. That, too, is against the law here.
>
>
>
>> (A friend who lives in NY says it is the same there.) If
>> you remonstrate with them - talk to them - they get all huffy.
>>
> You are telling them they are wrong for riding in a manner that is
> probably legal.

I don't tell NY bicycle riders anything. But those who live there can.
>
>
>> As to
>> runners, I meet them in the park all the time. They go faster than walkers,
>> they expect you to get out of their way. You have to be pretty spry
>> yourself to do so. Walking in the park is not for little old folks with
>> canes.
>>
> I guess not.

Good guess, Bill.

Donna Evleth
>
>
>
> --
> "Gonna take a sedimental journey", what Old Man River actually
> said.