From: Earl Evleth on
On 12/01/10 0:23, in article RdOdnRlTXsNmL9bWnZ2dnUVZ8iqdnZ2d(a)giganews.com,
"John Rennie" <john-rennie(a)talktalk.net> wrote:

> Officially perhaps but 'great' goes back to the 13th century

And of course Bretagne is in France. So if Britain wishes to
also use the name it has to be Grande Bretagne.

From: Earl Evleth on
On 12/01/10 18:42, in article LsOdnZWr2Z0ZKdHWnZ2dnUVZ8vli4p2d(a)giganews.com,
"Nightjar <"cpb"@" <"insertmysurnamehere>> wrote:

> The French have been griping about franglaise for at least half a century.

Relatively little. In fact I don't remember anybody griping here (my
35 years of a half o century living in Paris).

Some French think it "chic" to throw in a few English words,
it makes them look like they know English.

In fact the word "chic" comes from German, Schick
(skill, fitness, elegance), the verb
schicken means to outfit oneself.

From: Earl Evleth on
On 12/01/10 20:33, in article SPKdnRknCaEdU9HWnZ2dnUVZ8q9i4p2d(a)giganews.com,
"John Rennie" <john-rennie(a)talktalk.net> wrote:

> Which means you weren't there when DeGaulle was
> the big man.

Barely, we spent a year here in 65-66. Then 68 came
and that did him in. The young were not interested
about too much English coming in but how things
were generally run, old foggy style.

Some things were Americanized, like big shopping centers
at the edge of towns. McDonalds had not yet appeared.

Eventually some things were Americanized, but only that which
the French wanted. DeGaulle was pass´┐Ż, kaput, fini.

Changes occurred here but Americans still pictured the French
in berets riding down the street with a baguette staps to the back.

From: Donna Evleth on


> From: John Rennie <john-rennie(a)talktalk.net>
> Reply-To: john-rennie(a)talktalk.net
> Newsgroups: alt.activism.death-penalty,uk.politics.misc,rec.travel.europe
> Date: Tue, 12 Jan 2010 19:33:34 +0000
> Subject: Re: English invasion 'threatens Fwench language more than Nazis did'
>
> Earl Evleth wrote:
>> On 12/01/10 18:42, in article LsOdnZWr2Z0ZKdHWnZ2dnUVZ8vli4p2d(a)giganews.com,
>> "Nightjar <"cpb"@" <"insertmysurnamehere>> wrote:
>>
>>> The French have been griping about franglaise for at least half a century.
>>
>> Relatively little. In fact I don't remember anybody griping here (my
>> 35 years of a half o century living in Paris).
>
> Which means you weren't there when DeGaulle was
> the big man. He really hated the English
> mainly because he knew he should be grateful
> to them.

Earl may give this impression, but we lived in France for the first time in
1965-66. 1966 was when de Gaulle threw NATO out of France. I still
remember the vicious anti-American feeling I encountered at that time.

We were living in a rented apartment in the 18th arrondissement. Once our
concierges found out that we were American, there was an immediate bond.
The man of the couple had been gassed in WWI. During his rather long
hospital stay, he was in the same ward with an American soldier who had also
been gassed. They became friends. By the time we lived in this building,
both of the two had forgotten each other's language. I became a translator
for them (start of a long career). The day that Time Magazine announced
that de Gaulle had "thrown the Americans out of France", I had to go to some
important appointment, where it would have been inconvenient to take our
then 5-year-old daughter, our concierges volunteered to babysit, no charge.
I look back on this obviously vicious burst of anti-Americanism with
amusement, especially since our relatives in the US all contacted us,
worrying about our safety.

Later our concierge (the man) who was an amateur painter, did a watercolor
of our daughter and our dog in the snow (there was a major snow crisis in
Paris in December-January 1965-1966). I still have it, and treasure it.
Unlike de Gaulle, we were just real people, who knew and liked each other.
I have kept that in mind ever since, and thus try to avoid chips on my
shoulder.

Donna Evleth
>
>
>
>
>
>>
>> Some French think it "chic" to throw in a few English words,
>> it makes them look like they know English.
>>
>> In fact the word "chic" comes from German, Schick
>> (skill, fitness, elegance), the verb
>> schicken means to outfit oneself.
>>