From: Jens Arne Maennig on
Cathy L wrote:
> In Munich, as we walked down Landsburgerstrass, When someone
> approached, we would smile. Only younger people would smile back.
> Older people would not. It was morning, so Bill would say, " Guten
> Morgen".

Okay, now I understand:

1. No local would ever *walk* down Landsbergerstrasse. Why should you?
It's long, ugly and mostly pretty weired people hanging out there.

2. Somebody looking at you and greeting this way is really arousing
suspicion.

3. If I would have to walk on Landsbergerstrasse for some unfortunate
reason ("didn't find a spot in front of the door") and somebody would
approach me with an unusual smile greeting "Guten Morgen", I would be
sure that they would offer me a Watchtower or Awake! magazine next.
For that reason, I would have tried to look straight in front of me
with a fixed stare and I wouzld have tried hard to not even ignore
them.

4. When in Rome ...

Jens, spoiled by 20 years residing in Munich


From: Jens Arne Maennig on
Martin wrote:
> You should have written first.

Caution! Adapting local customs could lead to breaking some of your
precudices.

Jens


From: Gunter Herrmann on
Hi!

Cathy L wrote:

> In Munich, as we walked down Landsburgerstrass, When someone
> approached, we would smile. Only younger people would smile back.
> Older people would not. It was morning, so Bill would say, " Guten
> Morgen".

It might be OK in Hamburg or Berlin.

Try to accept the local differences!

brgds

--
Gunter "lived and worked in both Berlin and Munich" Herrmann
currently in Orlando, Florida, USA
From: Frank F. Matthews on


EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque) wrote:
>
>
> Cathy L wrote:
>
>> On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 13:37:27 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
>> <evgmsop(a)earthlink.net> wrote:

>>> Cathy L wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 14:04:55 +0200, Martin <me(a)address.invalid> wrote:

>>>>> Jens corrected your spelling so that when you next mention any of
>>>>> these places
>>>>> you will be able to spell them correctly.
>>>>>
>>>>> By the way how was your meeting with your long lost relatives?

>>>> Bill wasn't very correct with not adding the umlauts and all. I do
>>>> think everyone got the drift of where we went though. Obviously it was
>>>> just an attempt to make fun of him. I don't think there is a lot of
>>>> difference between Cologne and K´┐Żln, do you?

>>> Not if you discount both spelling and pronunciation! (Granted, it's
>>> the same city - but how would you know, since apparently you didn't
>>> stop long enough there - or anywhere else - to actually SEE it?)

>> We stayed at he Holiday Inn, at the Koln airport.

> But how much of the city could you see from a hotel at the airport?
> I've not been to Cologne, but most modern airports, whatever the city or
> country, seem to be surrounded by wide industrial areas, then slums,
> before you actually encounter the city proper.

Then again these days the airport is more the city than the cathedral.
From: Cathy L on
On Thu, 04 Oct 2007 12:38:02 -0700, Iceman <oneofcold(a)yahoo.com>
wrote:

>On Oct 4, 2:57 pm, Cathy L <lederer...(a)optonline.net> wrote:
>> On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 13:19:42 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
>>
>>
>>
>> <evgm...(a)earthlink.net> wrote:
>>
>> >S Viemeister wrote:
>>
>> >> EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque) wrote:
>>
>> >>> "Plenty" of citizens in almost ANY European country speak some English
>> >>> - But it's strange how easily they forget it, when accosted by
>> >>> arrogant Ameircan tourists who address them in English without even
>> >>> bothering to learn the basic pleasantries in the "official" language
>> >>> of the country!
>>
>> >> But we don't know whether they actually said 'good morning' or 'guten
>> >> morgen'.
>>
>> >True, but having read their posts for some time, now, I
>> >think it's safe to assume no word of a "foreign" language
>> >would ever sully their lips!
>>
>> Yes, we carried a translation book and always tried to use it whenever
>> possible. We found, in most countries, if you make an attempt, people
>> help you more.
>>
>> In Munich, as we walked down Landsburgerstrass, When someone
>> approached, we would smile. Only younger people would smile back.
>> Older people would not. It was morning, so Bill would say, " Guten
>> Morgen".
>
>
>What would happen if you approached people on the New York subway and
>said "Good Morning"?

I grew up in the City. You would at least get a response.

Cathy